Salvatore Pane

Tag: Wes Anderson

Bi-Weekly Friday Comics Roundup IV: Archie Meets the Punisher

I’ve decided to change this feature around a bit, as I’ve realized I don’t have the vocabulary necessary to talk about visual art in new and compelling ways every two weeks.  But I can talk about words, and I can talk about writers, so instead of “Bi-Weekly Friday Art Roundup”, I now christen this segment “Bi-Weekly Friday Comics Roundup”. Let us begin!

1. Umbrella Academy vol. 1 Apocalypse Suite written by Gerard Way with art from Gabriel Ba

I talked about this while discussing reading material on the way to AWP, but it’s so outstanding that it has to be mentioned again. A month or so back I did a top ten list of comics best suited for the literary inclined. This should be on there. Dense, madcap, and framed in the straight-on wide angle style of Wes Anderson, Way and Ba give us a twisted mashup of The Royal Tenenbaums and the X-Men. The best recommendation I can give for this book is that one of my friends–a woman who is certainly not a regular comic reader by any means–devoured this collection in its entirety on the plane.  An absolute must buy.

2. Punisher #16 written by Rick Remender with art from Tony Moore

The Punisher hasn’t been a character I’ve cared about since I was a kid. Sure, a younger, more vulnerable Sal enjoyed Punisher Kills the Marvel Universe and Archie Meets the Punisher, but I’ve found that I just don’t connect with his grim and gritty tales in the way I did when I listened to Slipknot and Korn. This changed with Remender and Moore’s latest arc on the title, “Frankencastle”, in which the Punisher is brutally murdered and resurrected as a Frankenstein-esque monster that has to defend an underground city of sentient beasts. Ok. Go back and reread that last sentence. How are you not reading this?

3. X-Force #26 written by Craig Kyle and Christopher Yost with art from Mike Choi

Like the Punisher, I haven’t really enjoyed X-Men since Chris Claremont and Jim Lee relaunched the title. I was about 8 years old. But the latest X-Crossover, “Second Coming”, has returned the title back to form. The macro-story involves the return of a mutant savior from the future with Rob Liefeld creation Cable. But on the micro-level, “Second Coming” is a popcorn action story about faith, humanity, and whether or not the ends justify the means. If you’re curious about the current state of the X-Men, start with the “Second Coming” one-shot. If not, try Joss Whedon’s Astonishing.

4. Artist Shintaro Kago

Scott McCloud (have you guys read Understanding Comics and Reinventing Comics? If not, run out to the local comic shop and purchase them both immediately) recently blogged about an awesome manga artist who hasn’t been published much in America. His name is Shintaro Kago, and while some of his art is NSFW, it’s very clear that the way he totally breaks the conventions of the comic page makes him an absolute master. I haven’t seen much from this guy, but this page alone makes me want to track down those anthologies McCloud mentioned.

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Bi-Weekly Friday Art Roundup II: Electric Boogaloo

Hi all. It’s time for another Bi-Weekly Friday Art Roundup. I would have liked to do a full post on the big comic news of the week–Marvel announcing an app for digital distribution on the iPad–but with AWP looming, I’m going to have to skip that for now and focus on smaller updates. For those of you who missed Roundup I, the purpose of these articles is to showcase artists I believe deserve recognition (and also to backdoor promote my upcoming graphic novel, The Black List). So why not just get started?

1. Sweet Tooth #7 by Jeff Lemire

Last month I did a top ten list of graphic novels for the literary inclined. Sweet Tooth would have made it, but at the time, it didn’t exist in paperback format, only in monthly issues. That is no longer the case. Without a doubt, Sweet Tooth is one of my favorite ongoing series. I won’t do the book any justice  describing what it’s about, so I’ll just say the work of writer/artist Jeff Lemire has to be seen to be believed. He eschews the realistic for a bizarre style that perfectly matches his apocalyptic dystopia. The most impressive aspect of his work is his facial features, something that gets glossed over by even the most successful of comic artists, especially those who photo reference. Lemire is not one of those artists. He positions his characters in straight-on, Wes Anderson style shots and lets their expressions tell the story. Anyone interested in the comics medium absolutely needs to study the work of Lemire, and there’s no better jumping on point than Sweet Tooth.

2. Blackest Night #8 Written by Geoff Johns with art from Ivan Reis

Blackest Night is an eight-issue miniseries that shows just how fun and insane superhero comics can really be. The conclusion to a multi-year story set in the Green Lantern section of the DC universe, BN succeeds on the merits of its hyper-talented artist, Ivan Reis. Check out this article by the good folks at iFanboy raving over the man’s ridiculous art skills. The average comic reader may not understand how difficult these events comics are to put out, but these are the toughest types of books to draw in the industry. Reis has to draw a cast of hundreds and literally squeezes dozens upon dozens of characters into single panels. Even if you know nothing about Green Lantern or Blackest Night, pick up this issue at a low, low price of four dollars for a master’s class in panel composition and character placement. Reis does not disappoint.

3. Unpublished Artist Tommy Smith

Tommy Smith is another artist I found on Mark Millar’s forums, and it’s very clear from a four-page sample of his work he posted that this man has chops. Being able to convey motion is a skill that sounds easier than it is to master, but right here in this one silent page, Smith gets across movement even while segmenting the flow of time. We don’t get every moment of this woman waking up, but it’s clear what’s happening thanks to the interesting angles and quirky subject choices. He doesn’t put the woman front and center in each panel. Sometimes she’s off to the side like in panel one, while others use a hyper close-up. Smith is currently looking for collaborators so if you’re a comic writer looking for someone who has storytelling down, consider shooting him an e-mail.

4. The Black List written by Salvatore Pane and Mark Kleman with art from Lamair Nash

This is one of the first finished pages Mark and I got back from Lamair, and we were absolutely floored. We posted a bunch of ads on various art websites looking for an artist and received many, many submissions. Lamair Nash was clearly the most talented, but we didn’t realize the extent of his skills until this page came in. Lamair takes a very simple, relateable moment–a twenty-something at a McJob caught goofing off by his boss–and turns it into something downright otherworldly. The closeup on protagonist Harry’s eye. The imposing figure of the boss. You can’t teach this stuff, folks. Lamair’s ability to make even the most mundane scenes bristle with energy and tension is one of the major reasons we so badly wanted to work with him on this project. And if this is what he does with a simple office scene, I can’t wait to show off what he can do with Richard Nixon firing rockets at stone mason mercenaries in secret underground laboratories.

5. Amazing Spider-Man #626 written by Fred Van Lente with art from Michael Gaydos

Three years ago I wrote articles for a great comic book website called Broken Frontier. Around the same time, a controversial of Amazing Spider-Man came out that rebooted the previous twenty years of continuity, namely the amount of time I’d followed the character. I flipped my shit. But since then, the thrice-monthly Amazing Spider-Man has been absolutely superb. The book employs a rotating cast of creators, including the brilliant writer Fred Van Lente whose MODOK’s 11 is an absolute must-read, that continues to put the screws to the life of lovable Peter Parker. Issue 626 is no different. Michael Gaydos is one of the best artists in the industry, and like Jeff Lemire, he is a master at facial expressions. Look at this exchange between Pete and his roommate Michelle Gonzalez. Is this the art you expect from a mainstream superhero book starring one of the most recognizable characters on Earth? No. It’s breathtaking. It’s a reminder of everything comics can accomplish. If you think Spider-Man begins and ends with Tobey Maguire and Sam Raimi, you owe it to yourself to run, RUN, to the nearest comic store and jump on board the new and improved Amazing.