Salvatore Pane

Tag: Sweet Tooth

Bi-Weekly Comics Friday Roundup VII: Obama, Spawn and Harry Potter Together At Last!!!

I’ve hit a bit of a buying comics lull. During the busiest of weeks, my pull list occasionally balloons into the low twenties (I know; I’m a huge dork). But ever since The Heroic Age started at Marvel, I’ve found myself picking up three books at most, occasionally four. This has less to do with the quality of the comics and more to do with Marvel reshuffling their line and staggering their big releases. I’m still reading a bunch of indie and DC/Vertigo titles, but Marvel definitely makes up the lion’s share of my pull list, and I was definitely reading the majority of their Dark Reign/Siege offerings. In terms of trades, I’m making my way through Daredevil: Born Again. I’ve never been a huge fan of the Man Without Fear, but Frank Miller is making me a believer.

All right, enough procrastination. Let’s talk some comics.

1. Guardians of the Globe #1 written by Robert Kirkman with art from Benito Cereno

I know almost nothing about the Guardians of the Globe. They’re a superhero team in the Invincible Universe created by Robert Kirkman, one of my favorite writers and the scribe behind my beloved Walking Dead. Normally, I wouldn’t check out this book because I do eventually plan on reading Invincible from the beginning. But this stunt is enough to pique my interest. A few months back, Image teased the team lineup including Barack Obama, Spawn, Rick Grimes (the black-and-white protagonist of Walking Dead), and a Harry Potter knock off. Eventually, Image admitted it was all a prank, but now Chris Giarrusso of G-MAN fame is writing a back-up feature in Guardians about the fake team. I’m sold. Barack and Spawn!? Fake Harry Potter!? RICK MOTHERFUCKING GRIMES!!?? This is going to eat my face.

2. Avengers #2 written by Brian Michael Bendis with art from John Romita Jr.

Look at that cover. No, really, LOOK AT THAT COVER! Are you kidding me? Really? It’s so awesome I can barely even focus right now. Look at those evil clowns in the bunny suits! How about the gnomes holding hands with the walking eyeballs!? As for the comic, well, I’m a huge Bendis devotee and John Romita Jr is the closest thing the American comic industry has to royalty. I didn’t fall head over heels in love with the first issue of the new series–I thought Secret Avengers #1 one-upped it–but I’m willing to give the time traveling Kang story another whirl for a cover this gloriously strange.

3. Irredeemable #14 written by Mark Waid with art from Diego Barreto

I’ve sung the praises of Irredeemable many times on this blog. I love Mark Waid, and I love his tale of a Superman analogue who has had enough of petty human demands and goes insane, murdering the Justice League and blowing up entire countries. But what I really love is this cover. It says it all, doesn’t it? You take one look at this cover and you know what you’re in store for. God bless you, Mark Waid. And please, if you haven’t read Irredeemable, do yourself a favor and pick up the first trade. It’s only ten bucks!

4. Thor and the Warriors Four #3 written by Alex Zalben with art from Gurihiru

Alez Zalben is hilarious. His comic book review show, appropriately titled Comic Book Club, is awesome and the CBC live show in New York is legendary (I’m dying to see it in person). I wouldn’t have picked this up if it wasn’t for Zalben, but I’m glad I did. He brings his trademark humor to the Thor/Power Pack franchises, and if you’re a bit tired of the doom and gloom of the more mainstream superhero books, Thor and the Warriors Four is the way to go. Let me just put this out there: Baby Beta Ray Bill. Ok. Is that sinking in yet? Go buy this book. And Marvel, please put Zalben on some kind of Short Halloween-esque Spider-Man one-shot.

5. Sweet Tooth #10 written and drawn by Jeff Lemire

I’ve gone back to the well a few times this week, but I just couldn’t resist highlighting Sweet Tooth once again based on this two-page spread. If it looks wonky on your display, I apologize. Just know that Sweet Tooth #10 is one of the trippiest comics I’ve read in forever. The second arc in Jeff Lemire’s opus hasn’t been quite as strong as the first, but the standout moments are so great that they demand readers stick with the series. Again, the first trade is only ten bucks. So if you’re one of those people who complains about not wanting to jump on Spider-Man because it’s in the 600th issue, shut up and go buy Sweet Tooth. You can catch up to ten.

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Bi-Weekly Friday Art Roundup II: Electric Boogaloo

Hi all. It’s time for another Bi-Weekly Friday Art Roundup. I would have liked to do a full post on the big comic news of the week–Marvel announcing an app for digital distribution on the iPad–but with AWP looming, I’m going to have to skip that for now and focus on smaller updates. For those of you who missed Roundup I, the purpose of these articles is to showcase artists I believe deserve recognition (and also to backdoor promote my upcoming graphic novel, The Black List). So why not just get started?

1. Sweet Tooth #7 by Jeff Lemire

Last month I did a top ten list of graphic novels for the literary inclined. Sweet Tooth would have made it, but at the time, it didn’t exist in paperback format, only in monthly issues. That is no longer the case. Without a doubt, Sweet Tooth is one of my favorite ongoing series. I won’t do the book any justice  describing what it’s about, so I’ll just say the work of writer/artist Jeff Lemire has to be seen to be believed. He eschews the realistic for a bizarre style that perfectly matches his apocalyptic dystopia. The most impressive aspect of his work is his facial features, something that gets glossed over by even the most successful of comic artists, especially those who photo reference. Lemire is not one of those artists. He positions his characters in straight-on, Wes Anderson style shots and lets their expressions tell the story. Anyone interested in the comics medium absolutely needs to study the work of Lemire, and there’s no better jumping on point than Sweet Tooth.

2. Blackest Night #8 Written by Geoff Johns with art from Ivan Reis

Blackest Night is an eight-issue miniseries that shows just how fun and insane superhero comics can really be. The conclusion to a multi-year story set in the Green Lantern section of the DC universe, BN succeeds on the merits of its hyper-talented artist, Ivan Reis. Check out this article by the good folks at iFanboy raving over the man’s ridiculous art skills. The average comic reader may not understand how difficult these events comics are to put out, but these are the toughest types of books to draw in the industry. Reis has to draw a cast of hundreds and literally squeezes dozens upon dozens of characters into single panels. Even if you know nothing about Green Lantern or Blackest Night, pick up this issue at a low, low price of four dollars for a master’s class in panel composition and character placement. Reis does not disappoint.

3. Unpublished Artist Tommy Smith

Tommy Smith is another artist I found on Mark Millar’s forums, and it’s very clear from a four-page sample of his work he posted that this man has chops. Being able to convey motion is a skill that sounds easier than it is to master, but right here in this one silent page, Smith gets across movement even while segmenting the flow of time. We don’t get every moment of this woman waking up, but it’s clear what’s happening thanks to the interesting angles and quirky subject choices. He doesn’t put the woman front and center in each panel. Sometimes she’s off to the side like in panel one, while others use a hyper close-up. Smith is currently looking for collaborators so if you’re a comic writer looking for someone who has storytelling down, consider shooting him an e-mail.

4. The Black List written by Salvatore Pane and Mark Kleman with art from Lamair Nash

This is one of the first finished pages Mark and I got back from Lamair, and we were absolutely floored. We posted a bunch of ads on various art websites looking for an artist and received many, many submissions. Lamair Nash was clearly the most talented, but we didn’t realize the extent of his skills until this page came in. Lamair takes a very simple, relateable moment–a twenty-something at a McJob caught goofing off by his boss–and turns it into something downright otherworldly. The closeup on protagonist Harry’s eye. The imposing figure of the boss. You can’t teach this stuff, folks. Lamair’s ability to make even the most mundane scenes bristle with energy and tension is one of the major reasons we so badly wanted to work with him on this project. And if this is what he does with a simple office scene, I can’t wait to show off what he can do with Richard Nixon firing rockets at stone mason mercenaries in secret underground laboratories.

5. Amazing Spider-Man #626 written by Fred Van Lente with art from Michael Gaydos

Three years ago I wrote articles for a great comic book website called Broken Frontier. Around the same time, a controversial of Amazing Spider-Man came out that rebooted the previous twenty years of continuity, namely the amount of time I’d followed the character. I flipped my shit. But since then, the thrice-monthly Amazing Spider-Man has been absolutely superb. The book employs a rotating cast of creators, including the brilliant writer Fred Van Lente whose MODOK’s 11 is an absolute must-read, that continues to put the screws to the life of lovable Peter Parker. Issue 626 is no different. Michael Gaydos is one of the best artists in the industry, and like Jeff Lemire, he is a master at facial expressions. Look at this exchange between Pete and his roommate Michelle Gonzalez. Is this the art you expect from a mainstream superhero book starring one of the most recognizable characters on Earth? No. It’s breathtaking. It’s a reminder of everything comics can accomplish. If you think Spider-Man begins and ends with Tobey Maguire and Sam Raimi, you owe it to yourself to run, RUN, to the nearest comic store and jump on board the new and improved Amazing.